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Trump Destroyed House Of Cards
- Dec 30, 2018 -


Since November last year, every time a politically related series has been aired, people will search for similarities and resonances with the new era. (The world's most popular political metaphor, Game of Thrones, will return in July to discuss Steve Bannon, whether it is Varys or Qyburn. Ready.)


Netflix's presidential-themed soap opera "House of Cards" is theoretically qualified to break the fourth wall of today's political dialogue. But this episode – at best, is just a thick ham, and Kevin Spacey puts the evil narration on top of the red-eyed gravy – never really withstood the scrutiny. The fifth season, which opened in late May, made the show a lame duck that was more embarrassing than ever.


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On the surface, there are a lot of surprises in "House of Cards": President Frank Underwood (Spence) proposes immigration bans; congressional hearings and leaks; Russia attempts to use American division to make a fuss Touched by a dramatic photo featuring a dead child, the president responded to the Syrian chemical weapons attack.


But the main part of the play is like a sense of a parallel universe, not just because of the power alliance between Frank and his wife Claire (Robin Wright), like the Clintons. The crazy conspiracy theory of the relationship.


The "House of Cards" adapted from an English drama is essentially an illusion of ability and omnipotence. The lever of Franck's power is as easy as pushing the poor Zoe Barnes to the subway train. He plays four-dimensional chess, and the people who are sitting in his position in reality are often playing hamster games. He is calm and cautious, not hot-headed and upset. He revealed his plans with Shakespeare's dramatic monologue, and President Trump revealed the plan to his 31 million Twitter fans.


The more serious disconnect between reality and reality is that it believes that there are still rules that dominate politics and that they are challenging to create dramatic – Scandal, Designated Survivor, Many political dramas such as the "Madam Secretary" have this problem. The role of the character in the play is based on a weird cognition: if it is discovered, it will suffer shame and consequences.


Frank will try to cover up his violence. In our world, a Montana politician was elected to the House of Representatives the next day. When a member of Frank's political party (here, the Democratic Party) intends to confront him and put "national interests above the party's interests," he may have contributed the biggest laughter of the season.


In addition, the concept of being in charge of the adult and the president’s position is still subject to the etiquette of the scene. It has been collapsed because of the election of a TV star. To some extent, this person relies on not playing cards. Has attracted many followers. The madness of "House of Cards" is no less than reality. But it sets a more normal baseline in its own world.


Even HBO's comedy "Veep" has this problem - this drama is mostly creative swearing, but there is a fascinating loneliness: people in the drama need to hide their wretchedness from the public. However, some non-political TV dramas have captured the current atmosphere of the scales and claws. The "Mr. Robot" and "Legion" are the subject of conspiracy and manipulation; The Good Fight reflects the ups and downs of the liberals.


But now, you need to go back to the earlier TV era and throw the switch to Washington's story line to find the best TV show that echoes today's White House.


For example, The Sopranos is a true reflection of the president's situation more than any of today's TV shows, even though it was broadcast from the Clinton era to the Bush era. Think of the impermanent anti-heroes in the play, Tony Soprano, the head of the underworld, a person driven by desire; a person who has a Baroque taste for his family; and one who asks others to be faithful to himself. A person who does not set similar requirements for himself; a person who will reward the person who bows his head; a person who will impulsively attack (Ralph Cifaretto); a pair of "strong and yet The silent man’s image is longing for, but he whispers to the grievances; a person who is arrogant and arrogant. ("It’s better to make a decision than to hesitate," Tony said.)


This is not to say that Trump-led White House is like a gangster, but that the "The Sopranos" is quite suitable because it depicts the leadership of a shackled, privately-controlled family business.


Equally different is Arrested Development, a family that resembles the Trang family and has spawned one of the most colorful social networks in 2017. On The Daily Beast, Erin Gloria Ryan connects the Trump family to the Bruce family. The latter is a cunning real estate developer family whose head, George (Jeffrey Tambor), has legal troubles due to tax issues and some sort of “slight treason” behavior. . After the American Health Care Act failed to pass in March, Dan Diamond, the author of the Politico website, and the Bruce family tried to sell a shell house as a real estate. The practice of going out is comparable.

Aside from the details of the specific situation (the Bruce family discussed the construction of a US-Mexico border wall), the play has a very interactive relationship with us. The outside world has always believed that Trump likes to provoke people to fight each other, whether in the business, in The Apprentice, or in the White House.


This is also the management style of the old George Bruce, who spreads the seeds of jealousy and insecurity among his adult children in order to better control them to join a competition with the theme of "Daddy loves who". (Shawn, Kelly Ann: This drama will make your mood difficult to calm down.)

The "Deterioration of Development", which was launched in 2003, is the best TV drama of the previous president. It has somehow commented on the Iraq war in a sly way. In the episode of the fake house, before the house collapsed, Gob Bluth (Will Arnett) made a "mission completion" banner on the facade, and George W. Bush ( George W. Bush) is no different.


All of this means that the representative TV series of the Trump era, no matter when it arrives, may not be political. And it may be a comedy, even though we experience reality as if it were in a drama.

In fact, it may be "development blocked." Netflix recently announced that it will shoot the fifth season (it took the fourth season in 2013.) Its founder Mitch Hurwitz said in a statement that he is looking forward to injecting new characters into his role. Vitality: "Old George, Lucille and the children, Michael, Ivanka, Xiao Tang, Eric, George-Michael, who have I forgotten, oh, Tiffany. Did I say Tiffany? ”


It is often said that history will repeat itself. In this case, both are in the form of farce. .



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